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Thursday, July 15, 2010

Dehydration in Oracle BPEL
















Transaction Management Prerequistes in BPEL --- 
                 SOA Suite 11g Transaction Semantics Part 2
                 SOA Suite 11g Transaction Semantics Part 3
                 
Over the life cycle of a BPEL instance, the instance with its current state of execution may be saved in a database. When a BPEL instance is saved to a database, the instance is also known as being dehydrated. The database where the BPEL instance is saved is called a dehydration store.

Once a BPEL instance is dehydrated, Oracle BPEL Server can off load it from the memory of Oracle BPEL Server. When a certain event occurs, such as the arrival of a message or the expiration of a timer, Oracle BPEL Server locates and loads the pertinent BPEL instance from the dehydration store back into the memory of Oracle BPEL Server and resumes the execution of the process instance. Dehydrating BPEL instances offers reliability. If Oracle BPEL Server crashes in the middle of executing a process, the instance can be recovered automatically, programmatically, or manually from the dehydrated states. When Oracle BPEL Server resumes the execution of the process instance, it resumes from the last dehydration point, which is the last state of the instance that Oracle BPEL Server saves to the dehydration store.

                When and how the dehydration occurs differs based on the process types:

Transient process — Oracle BPEL Server dehydrates the process instance only once at the end of the process. When a host crashes in the middle of running the process instance, the instances are not visible from Oracle BPEL Control.
Durable process — Oracle BPEL Server dehydrates the process instance in-flight at all midprocess breakpoint and non-idempotent activities, plus the end of the process. When the server crashes, this process instance appears in Oracle BPEL Control up to the last dehydration point (breakpoint activity) once the server restarts. If the server crashes before the process instance reaches the first midprocess breakpoint activity, the instance is not visible in Oracle BPEL Control after the server restarts.

        There are three cases in which dehydration occurs:

1> When the BPEL instance encounters a mid-process breakpoint activity (not including the initial receive)

That is where an existing BPEL instance must wait for an event, which can be either a timer expiration or message arrival. When the event occurs (the alarm expires or the message arrives), the instance is loaded from the dehydration store and execution is resumed. This type of dehydration occurs only in durable processes, which have mid-process breakpoint activities. A transient process does not have any midprocess breakpoint activities.

2> When the BPEL instance encounters a nonidempotent activity

When Oracle BPEL Server recovers after a crash, it retries the activities in the process instance. However, it should only retry the idempotent activities. Therefore, when Oracle BPEL Server encounters a nonidempotent activity, it dehydrates it. This enables Oracle BPEL Server to memorize that this activity was performed once and is not performed again when Oracle BPEL Server recovers from a crash.

3>  When the BPEL instance finishes

At the end of the BPEL process, Oracle BPEL Server saves the process instance to the dehydration store, unless you explicitly configure it not to do so. This happens to both durable and transient processes. For transient processes, the end of the process is the only point where the process instance is saved. This is because a transient process does not have any mid-process breakpoint activities and nonidempotent activities where the in-flight dehydration can occur.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Good one...

Anonymous said...

"...unless you explicitly configure it not to do so" - Where it can be configured?

Amiya Kumar said...

you can set the property idempotent =true on activity level to avoid dehydration. Please go to http://bpelknowledge.blogspot.com/2010/09/performnace-tuning-in-soa-10g.html for more details

Anonymous said...

Good explanation.,Thanku

Anonymous said...

good one..

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